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PL5110 - Government and Politics in Developing Areas

Credit points: 3
Year: 2015
Student Contribution Band: Band 1
Administered by: College of Arts, Society & Education

This comparative politics subject introduces students to a variety of analytical approaches to politics in the developing world. It compares the major political practices and institutions of various countries, their structures of government, the role of the military in politics, the bureaucracy, economic development, civil society and democratisation, political parties and participation, violence, opposition, and regional organisations such as ASEAN and APEC. Because of the region's importance to Australia, the subject focuses on the Asia-Pacific, but students may choose to work on the developing world elsewhere (eg Latin America, Africa, Eastern Europe).

Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate and reflect critically on advanced and integrated knowledge of political theory, key concepts, or practice and professional ethics in comparative politics or government and politics in the developing world;
  • Demonstrate knowledge of research principles and methods in comparative politics or government and politics in the developing world;
  • Analyse critically and evaluate political/economic/social systems, institutions, structures and/or practices in the developing world;
  • Generate, analyse, synthesise and evaluate complex perspectives, arguments and sources of qualitative and/or quantitative data pertinent to complex social, political, historical, economic, environmental and/or cultural issues, particularly those related to quality of life in the tropics worldwide;
  • Interpret and justify to a specialist and non-specialist audience theoretical propositions, methodologies, conclusions and professional decisions through advanced literacy and, where appropriate, numeracy skills;
  • Design and execute a substantial social science research-based project with a high level of autonomy and accountability;
  • Apply political theory or key concepts to research, demonstrating advanced understanding of the relationship between theory and practice, including recent developments, in comparative politics or government and politics in the developing world;
  • Respectfully and responsibly apply expert knowledge of diversity and difference among people, especially vulnerable and Indigenous peoples, in scholarship and/or professional practice;
  • Adapt and apply knowledge and skills to identify complex problems and pose creative solutions to social and/or environmental challenges facing peoples and societies in diverse tropical contexts worldwide.
Inadmissible
Subject
Combinations:
PL2110 and PL3110

Availabilities

Townsville, Internal, Study Period 1
Census Date 26-Mar-2015
Coordinator: <Person not found>, Assoc. Professor Surin Maisrikrod
Lecturers: <Person not found>, Assoc. Professor Surin Maisrikrod.
Workload expectations:
  • 26 hours lectures
  • 10 hours tutorials
Assessment: end of semester exam (40%); tutorial attendance and participation (10%); essays (50%).

External, Study Period 1
Census Date 26-Mar-2015
Coordinator: <Person not found>, Assoc. Professor Surin Maisrikrod
Lecturers: <Person not found>, Assoc. Professor Surin Maisrikrod.
Method of Delivery: andCDROMWWW - LearnJCU
Assessment: end of semester exam (50%); weekly commentaries and essays (50%).

Cairns, Internal, Study Period 1
Census Date 26-Mar-2015
Coordinator: <Person not found>, Assoc. Professor Surin Maisrikrod
Lecturers: <Person not found>, Assoc. Professor Surin Maisrikrod.
Workload expectations:
  • 26 hours lectures
  • 10 hours tutorials
Assessment: end of semester exam (40%); tutorial attendance and participation (10%); essays (50%).

Note: Minor variations might occur due to the continuous Subject quality improvement process, and in case of minor variation(s) in assessment details, the Subject Outline represents the latest official information.