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PC2002 - Molecular Basis of Therapeutics 3

Credit points: 3
Year: 2012
Student Contribution Band: Band 4
Administered by: School of Pharmacy & Molecular Sciences

Available to students enrolled in the Bachelor of Pharmacy.

This subject builds upon the fundamental concepts of pharmacology and medicinal chemistry introduced in the first year of the Pharmacy program. It deals with the concepts of pharmacokinetics, including the mechanisms of drug metabolism and excretion. The subject also introduces the basic principles of toxicology. The importance of chemical analysis in relation to drug development, forensic science, drug testing and clinical diagnosis is examined. Specific topics to be covered include instrumental methods of analysis and structure determination (particularly NMR, chromatographic separation techniques (HPLC and GLC, thermal analysis methods (DSC and TGA) and Vibrational Spectroscopic techniques (FTIR and Raman spectroscopy). Approaches to the development of new pharmaceutical agents, including pharmacognosy, rational drug design and high-throughput screening are also introduced.

Learning Outcomes

  • current approaches to the development of new pharmaceutical agents, including rational drug design, drug screening and natural product pharmacology;
  • the basic principles of toxicology, including the role of the liver in drug and xenobiotic transformation;
  • the manner in which drugs are handled by the body (pharmacokinetics), including the mechanisms of drug metabolism and excretion;
  • the role of chemical analysis in drug development, forensic science, drug testing and clinical diagnosis.

Graduate Qualities

  • The ability to think critically, to analyse and evaluate claims, evidence and arguments;
  • The ability to adapt knowledge to new situations;
  • The ability to define and to solve problems in at least one discipline area;
  • The ability to calculate, produce, interpret and communicate numerical information;
  • A coherent and disciplined body of skills, knowledge, values and professional ethics in at least one discipline area;
  • The ability to learn independently and in a self-directed manner;
  • A commitment to lifelong learning and intellectual development.
Prerequisites: CH1001 and PC1005
Inadmissible
Subject
Combinations:
PP3150

Availabilities

Townsville, Study Period 1, Internal
Census Date 22-Mar-2012
Coordinator: Assoc. Professor Michael Oelgemoeller
Lecturers: Professor Beverley Glass, Dr Winnie Lee, Assoc. Professor Bruce Bowden, <Person not found>.
Workload expectations:
  • 36 hours lectures
  • 6 hours tutorials
  • 24 hours practicals
Assessment: end of semester exam (70%); laboratory performance and reports (30%).

Note: Minor variations might occur due to the continuous Subject quality improvement process, and in case of minor variation(s) in assessment details, the Subject Outline represents the latest official information.