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EV3009 - Foundations of Natural Resource Management

Credit points: 3
Year: 2012
Student Contribution Band: Band 2
Administered by: Sch of Earth & Environmental Sciences

This subject provides an introduction to the critical components of natural resource management. It develops a full understanding of the way natural resource management occurs in Australia, the political and historical roots of the present structures and the foundations of modern management approaches. It identifies the holistic and ecosystem-based approaches taken and develops technical skills in the social, economic, ecological and political dimensions of natural resource management. Case studies deal with a range of forestry, farming and grazing examples as well as increasingly important indigenous contributions. The integration of environmental and social elements is central. There will be some comparative studies of international issues.

Learning Outcomes

  • Appreciation of the development of modern natural resource management systems in Australia;
  • Understanding of the current practices and issues of one or more NRM systems;
  • Appreciation of the links between natural resource management and biodiversity conservation;
  • Appreciation of the role of humans in precipitating and regulating environmental change;
  • Understanding of the primary tasks for environmental rehabilitation in Australia.

Graduate Qualities

  • The ability to think critically, to analyse and evaluate claims, evidence and arguments, and to reason and deploy evidence clearly and logically;
  • The ability to deploy critically evaluated information to practical ends;
  • The ability to find and access information using appropriate media and technologies;
  • The ability to evaluate that information;
  • The ability to select and organise information and to communicate it accurately, cogently, coherently, creatively and ethically;
  • The acquisition of coherent and disciplined sets of skills, knowledge, values and professional ethics from at least one discipline area;
  • The ability to manage future career and personal development;
  • The ability to read complex and demanding texts accurately, critically and insightfully;
  • The ability to speak and write clearly, coherently and creatively;
  • The ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences;
  • The ability to work with people of different gender, age, ethnicity, culture, religion and political persuasion;
  • The ability to work individually and independently;
  • The ability to use online technologies effectively and ethically.
Prerequisites: AT LEAST 12 CREDIT POINTS OF LEVEL 2 SUBJECTS INCLUDING 6 CREDIT POINTS OF LEVEL 2 EV OR EA
Inadmissible
Subject
Combinations:
EV5009

Availabilities

Cairns, Study Period 1, Internal
Census Date 22-Mar-2012
Coordinator: <Person not found>
Lecturers: <Person not found>, Assoc. Professor Peter Valentine, <Person not found>, Assoc. Professor Stephen Sutton, Professor Colin Simpfendorfer, Dr Rosemary Hill.
Workload expectations:
  • 26 hours lectures
  • 10 hours tutorials
  • 10 hours workshops/Seminars
  • 16 hours fieldwork
Assessment: end of semester exam (40%); presentations (20%); field report (20%); essay (20%).

Townsville, Study Period 1, Internal
Census Date 22-Mar-2012
Coordinator: Assoc. Professor Peter Valentine
Lecturers: <Person not found>, Assoc. Professor Peter Valentine, <Person not found>, Assoc. Professor Stephen Sutton, Professor Colin Simpfendorfer, Dr Rosemary Hill.
Workload expectations:
  • 26 hours lectures
  • 10 hours tutorials
  • 10 hours workshops/Seminars
  • 16 hours fieldwork
Assessment: end of semester exam (40%); presentations (20%); field report (20%); essay (20%).

Note: Minor variations might occur due to the continuous Subject quality improvement process, and in case of minor variation(s) in assessment details, the Subject Outline represents the latest official information.