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BX3023 - Economic Growth and Regional Development

Credit points: 3
Year: 2012
Student Contribution Band: Band 3
Administered by: School of Business

Available to all JCU students although it is assumed that those who choose to enrol have a sound understanding of introductory economic principles.

Why are some countries richer than others? Why do the incomes of some regions grow rapidly while others stagnate? What can policy makers do to promote sustainable economic development? Or, to put it another way, how can we make the most of the good things that economic growth has to offer, while minimising some of its unwanted side effects? This subject uses economics to provide insights to these, and other related questions. It does this by providing students with a set of analytical tools that allow them to (a) identify factors which influence economic growth - over time, and across 'space'; (b) consider some of the effects, and side effects, of economic growth; and (b) develop and evaluate polices that seek to promote regional development. It should therefore be of interest to a broad range of people - those who are keen to find ways of promoting sustainable economic development, or those who simply wish to work, live or play in regional areas (like Townsville) and/or in developing countries.

Learning Outcomes

  • Students completing this subject will be able to: Understand, interpret and compile measures of economic growth and regional development;
  • Understand theories that seek to explain the way in which the economies of regions/countries change over time;
  • Understand theories that seek to explain the way in which the economic structure of communities/industries differ across space;
  • Understand some social and environmental issues that are inextricably linked to economic growth;
  • Use theories (models) that are introduced in this subject to analyse real and hypothetical economic circumstances and to derive policy solutions to the problems posed in these circumstances.

Graduate Qualities

  • The ability to adapt knowledge to new situations;
  • The ability to define and to solve problems in at least one discipline area;
  • The ability to think critically, to analyse and evaluate claims, evidence and arguments, and to reason and deploy evidence clearly and logically;
  • The ability to deploy critically evaluated information to practical ends;
  • The ability to find and access information using appropriate media and technologies;
  • The ability to evaluate that information;
  • An understanding of the economic, legal, ethical, social and cultural issues involved in the use of information;
  • The ability to select and organise information and to communicate it accurately, cogently, coherently, creatively and ethically;
  • The acquisition of coherent and disciplined sets of skills, knowledge, values and professional ethics from at least one discipline area;
  • The ability to generate, calculate, interpret and communicate numerical information in ways appropriate to a given discipline or discourse;
  • The ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences;
  • The ability to lead, manage and contribute effectively to teams;
  • The ability to work with people of different gender, age, ethnicity, culture, religion and political persuasion;
  • The ability to work individually and independently;
  • The ability to select and use appropriate tools and technologies.
Prerequisites: BU1003 OR EC1001 OR EC1005
Inadmissible
Subject
Combinations:
EC2001 AND EC3412 AND EC3420 AND EC5205

Availabilities

Cairns, Study Period 7, Block
Census Date 05-Jul-2012
Face to face teaching 01-Jul-2012 to 10-Jul-2012 (Face to face dates: Sun 1 July 9am to 1pm; 2 to 4 July and 9 to 10 July, 9am to 4pm; Final exam 13 July 2 - 4pm.)
Coordinator: Assoc. Professor Riccardo Welters
Lecturer: Dr Hong-Bo Liu.
Workload expectations:
  • 38 hours workshops/Seminars - Lectorials
Assessment: quizzes or tests (30%); presentations (10%); assignments (30%); school-administered final exam (30%).

JCU Singapore, Study Period 52, Internal
Census Date 09-Aug-2012
Workload expectations:
  • 26 hours lectures
  • 12 hours tutorials
Assessment: end of semester exam (30%); quizzes or tests (30%); presentations (10%); assignments (30%).

JCU Singapore, Study Period 53, Internal
Census Date 15-Nov-2012
Coordinator: Assoc. Professor Riccardo Welters
Workload expectations:
  • 26 hours lectures
  • 12 hours tutorials
Assessment: end of semester exam (30%); quizzes or tests (30%); presentations (10%); assignments (30%).

Townsville, Study Period 1, Internal
Census Date 22-Mar-2012
Coordinator: Assoc. Professor Riccardo Welters
Lecturers: Assoc. Professor Riccardo Welters, <Person not found>.
Workload expectations:
  • 38 hours workshops/Seminars - Lectorials
Assessment: quizzes or tests (30%); presentations (10%); assignments (30%); school-administered final exam (30%).

Note: Minor variations might occur due to the continuous Subject quality improvement process, and in case of minor variation(s) in assessment details, the Subject Outline represents the latest official information.